Category Archive: Brain Healthy Diet

  1. Top 7 Brain Benefits of Drinking Water

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    The human brain is made up of approximately 75% water, so it is no surprise that dehydration has a dramatic effect on brain health.

    Dehydration

    Dehydration takes place when there is a deficit of water and salts that are essential for regular bodily functions.   Mineral imbalances hinder normal brain operation.  Mental fatigue, memory problems, and mental confusion can result when the brain isn’t properly hydrated.  Grey matter in the brain actually shrinks, and chronic long term dehydration can cause the brain to age prematurely.

    How Dehydration Impacts Your Brain

    *   Mental fatigue
    *   Problems with information processing
    *   Mood changes
    *   Premature aging of the brain

    Drinking filtered spring water is the best way to stay hydrated.  If you take your body weight and divide it by two, you will have calculated the ounces of water you need to consume per day.  Soda, coffee, and black tea are acidic beverages, so they don’t count toward your daily hydration goal.

    7 Brain Benefits of Staying Hydrated

    Discover why drinking to your brain health really can make a difference in your life:

    1.  Supports healthy brain cells
    2.  Improves concentration
    3.  Helps to balance mood and emotions
    4.  Improves quality of your sleep
    5.  Maintain memory function
    6.  Eliminates toxins and free radicals from your blood
    7.  Improves blood flow and oxygen to the brain

  2. The Fork versus The Treadmill

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    When time is short… it can be tempting to skip working out.  We don’t have time. We get bored with the same exercise program. An unexpected event happens, and we’re left feeling drained.

    Sound familiar?

    When faced with these scenarios remember:  The fork is more important than the treadmill. You heard right.  When you miss a few workouts, your nutrition program becomes a key factor in determining whether you start heading down a slippery slope or just encounter a small stumbling block.

    What we put in our mouths affects our energy level, mood, and sleep patterns.  Most people gravitate toward sugar, salt and processed food when they fall off the exercise wagon, making their derailment much worse.  They develop an “all or nothing” mentality.

    Sticking to protein, good fats, and plenty of vegetables will keep you in check during these times.  And when you feel good about your food choices you will be more likely to get back up on your “horse” (or treadmill, bike, weights, yoga, etc.) again much sooner.

    Article by Lisa Lineberg, Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist,  BS in Exercise Physiology

  3. Dehydration and Your Brain

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    The human brain is made up of approximately 75% water, so it is no surprise that dehydration has a dramatic effect on brain health.

    Dehydration takes place when there is a deficit of water and salts that are essential for regular bodily functions.   Mineral imbalances hinder normal brain operation.  Mental fatigue, memory problems, and mental confusion can result when the brain isn’t properly hydrated.  Grey matter in the brain actually shrinks, and chronic long term dehydration can cause the brain to age prematurely.

    How Dehydration Impacts Your Brain

    • Mental fatigue
    • Problems with information processing
    • Mood changes
    • Premature aging of the brain

    Drinking filtered spring water is the best way to stay hydrated.  If you take your body weight and divide it by two you will have calculated the ounces of water you need to consume per day.  Soda, coffee, and black tea are acidic beverages, so they don’t count toward your daily hydration goal.

    Article by Tracey Fox. Tracey is a nutritional specialist.

  4. Understanding Leptin and the Impact on Your Brain

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    Did you know that hunger is regulated in our brains?

    The hypothalamus controls appetite and is responsible for maintenance of body weight.  Leptin, a hormone produced in our fat cells, sends a signal to the hypothalamus that you are full.  The result is you stop eating.  When adequate leptin is not present or the receptors on the brain are not working correctly the result is overeating.

    How can you maintain proper leptin levels?

    One way is to monitor fructose consumption.   Have you ever noticed that you can eat sweets and never seem to get full?  Too much fructose makes your brain resistant to leptin.  The largest concentration of fructose comes in sodas, juices, energy drinks, and sweets.  Other hidden sources include ketchup, salad dressings, bottled sauces, and most pre-packaged foods.

    Avoiding high-fructose foods and beverages will keep your brain sharp so you can push away from the table when you are full.

    Article by Lisa Lineberg, Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist who holds a BS in Exercise Physiology